Terms Used in Division

The terms used in division are dividend, divisor, quotient and remainder.

Division is repeated subtraction.

For example:

24 ÷ 6
How many times would you subtract 6 from 24 to reach 0?
24 - 6 = 18 one time
18 - 6 = 12 two times
12 - 6 = 6 three times
6 - 6 = 0 four times

For every multiplication fact, there are two division facts.

For example:

(i) 5 × 7 = 35
35 ÷ 5 = 7; 35 ÷ 7 = 5

(ii) 8 × 6 = 48
48 ÷ 8 = 6; 48 ÷ 6 = 8

(iii) 9 × 5 = 45 is the same as 45 ÷ 9 = 5

7 × 9 = 63 is the same as 63 ÷ 7 = 9

Each of the terms used in division are explained below:

The number which is divided is called the dividend.

The number which divides is called the divisor.

The number which is the result of the division is called the quotient.

If there is any number left over, it is called the remainder.


The answer of a division operation can be verified in the following manner:

Quotient × Divisor + Remainder = Dividend


Consider the following examples to understand the terms showing in the division:

(i) 54 divided by 6

The terms used in division are dividend, divisor, quotient and remainder

Dividend = Divisor × Quotient + Remainder

54 = 6 × 9 + 0

(ii) 81 divided by 9

Division terms showing in the division

Dividend = Divisor × Quotient + Remainder

81 = 9 × 9 + 0

Related Concept

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Multiplication of a Number by a 3-Digit Number

Multiply a Number

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Multiplication and Division

Terms Used in Division

Division of Two-Digit by a One-Digit Numbers

Division of Four-Digit by a One-Digit Numbers

Division by 10 and 100 and 1000

Dividing Numbers

Estimating the Quotient

Division by Two-Digit Numbers

Word Problems on Division


4th Grade Math Activities

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