Class Limits

We will discuss here about the class limits.

Let the class intervals for some grouped data 5 – 15, 15 – 30, 30 – 45, 45 – 60, etc. Here, all the class intervals are overlapping and the distribution is continuous. 5 and 15 are called the class limits of the class interval 5 – 15:

                       5 is the lower limit and 15 is the upper limit of the class.

Similarly, 15 and 30 are the respectively lower limit and upper limit of the class interval 15 – 30. Clearly, the upper limit of a class interval is the same as the lower limit of the next class interval in case of overlapping groups.

Next, let the class intervals for some grouped data be 1 – 5, 6 – 10, 11 – 15, etc. Here, the class intervals are nonoverlapping and the distribution is discontinuous. 1 and 5 are called the class limits of the class interval 1 – 5:

                       1 is the lower limit and 5 is the upper limit.

Similarly, 6 is the lower limit and 10 is the upper limit of the next class interval 6 – 10. Clearly, the upper limit of a class interval is different from the lower limit of the next class interval in case of nonoverlapping groups.

Thus, in cases of overlapping as well as nonoverlapping class intervals the class 10 – 20 has the lower limit 10 and the upper limit 20.










9th Grade Math

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